Paolo Nespoli reads Emily Dickinson

There is a solitude of space
A solitude of sea
A solitude of death, but these
Society shall be
Compared with that profounder site
That polar privacy
A soul admitted to itself–
Finite Infinity.

Sputnik-2 or: Laika, Our Hero

Laika was a Soviet space dog who became one of the first animals in space, and the first animal to orbit the Earth. Laika, a stray dog from the streets of Moscow, was selected to be the occupant of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik 2 that was launched into outer space on November 3, 1957.
Little was known about the impact of spaceflight on living creatures at the time of Laika's mission, and the technology to de-orbit had not yet been developed, so Laika's survival was never expected. Some scientists believed humans would be unable to survive the launch or the conditions of outer space, so engineers viewed flights by animals as a necessary precursor to human missions. The experiment aimed to prove that a living passenger could survive being launched into orbit and endure a Micro-g environment, paving the way for human spaceflight and providing scientists with some of the first data on how living organisms react to spaceflight environments.
Laika died within hours from overheating, possibly caused by a failure of the central R-7 sustainer to separate from the payload. The true cause and time of her death were not made public until 2002; instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on day six or, as the Soviet government initially claimed, she was euthanised prior to oxygen depletion.
On April 11, 2008, Russian officials unveiled a monument to Laika. A small monument in her honour was built near the military research facility in Moscow that prepared Laika's flight to space. It features a dog standing on top of a rocket. She also appears on the Monument to the Conquerors of Space in Moscow.
video via Popular Science

Abstract: The Universe at Lattice-Fields

Guido, G. and Filippelli, G. (2017) The Universe at Lattice-Fields. Journal of High Energy Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology, 3, 828-860. doi:10.4236/jhepgc.2017.34060.
We formulate the idea of a Universe crossing different evolving phases $U_k^*$ where in each phase one can define a basic field at lattice structure $U_k$ increasing in mass (Universe-lattice). The mass creation in $U_k$ has a double consequence for the equivalence "mass-space": Increasing gravity (with varying metric) and increasing space (expansion). We demonstrate that each phase is at variable metric beginning by open metric and to follow a flat metric and after closed. Then we define the lattice-field of intersection between two lattice fields of base into universe and we analyse the universe in the Nucleo-synthesis phase and in the that of recombination. We show that the phase is built on the intersection of the lattices of the proton and electron. We show $U_H$ [the intersection between proton's anch electron's lattices] to be at variable metric (open in the past, flat in the present and closed in the future). Then, we explain some fundamental aspects of this universe $U_H$: Hubble's law by creating the mass-space in it, its age (13.82 million of Years) as time for reaching the flat metric phase and the value of critic density. In last we talk about dark universe lattice, having hadronic nature, and calculating its spatial step and its density in present phase of [the universe].
For some personal problems, I cannot add the LaTeX figures, so I uploaded them on researchgate.